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  • Chandi Kelley, "Seascaped," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Gilded Rose," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Portals," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Growth Rings," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Gold Leaf," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Aureate," Archival Inkjet Print, 2012

  • Chandi Kelley, "Pebble (as meteor)," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Unnatural History (frog)," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Unnatural History (cockroach)," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Unnatural History (butterfly)," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Unnatural History (flies)," Archival Inkjet Print, 2013

  • Chandi Kelley, "Reveal," Digital Video, 1:27

  • Installation at Hillyer Art Space, 2013

  • Installation at Hillyer Art Space, 2013

  • Installation at Hillyer Art Space, 2013

  • Installation at Hillyer Art Space, 2013

  • Installation at Hillyer Art Space, 2013

Inherently, the photograph is a source of information. It is a representation of the world at a specific moment in time. We take for granted that this information is truth, that it is a confirmation of reality. Photography allows the coexistence of nature and artificiality to reflect both our understanding and estrangement in the world, bringing the unknown into focus and putting what we think we know into question.

In a world of immediacy and instant gratification, things need to be eye-catching, bold, and obvious to be understood. As nature becomes more commonplace through an oversaturation of images, it is increasingly difficult to be surprised by the beauty of the natural world. We now require things to be unnaturally beautiful in order to take our breath away.

Unnatural Histories highlights the tension between fiction and documentation through constructed environments and the objects that inhabit them. I seek blurred lines between the real and the unreal, and the points where these two worlds intersect. In this body of work I have applied artifice to natural objects, and sometimes to artificial objects that mimic the natural. The application of gold in various forms is an over the top gesture to draw attention to natural beauty, create a spectacle of nature, and perhaps even to assign value to waning preciousness. By adding superfluous attributes, I manipulate these objects until they become relics of a false natural history, teetering on a line between the familiar and the unfamiliar.